Filler
Photo of Shira

 

 

PHOTO CREDIT: Above photo by John Rickman Photography, San Jose, California.

Tips & Tricks

for Belly Dance Costuming

by Shira & Others

 

Table of Contents

 

The tips and tricks on this page all relate to costuming and make-up issues for belly dancers. These ideas will help you look the best you possibly can when you step out on stage!

Do you have any tips or tricks you're willing to share on my page? E-mail them to me and I'll add them! Of course, I'll include appropriate attribution indicating you as the source!

 

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Choosing a Costume Design

 

By Shira

  • Bra Straps. If you're a "C" cup or bigger, do not wear a bra with a halter-style strap! It will bind painfully across the back of your neck, putting pressure on your vertebrae, and can contribute to long-term neck or back pain.
  • Bra Straps. Designs that are safe for your body, provide attractive cleavage, and don't fall down while you're dancing include criss-crossing the straps across the back (as shown in the photo to the right), or putting a "T" bar across the upper shoulder blades to join the straps on either side. A bonus: these strap styles make your dance bra look less like lingerie and more like a costume component. Click on the photo to see it in more detail. Photographer's name withheld by request.
  • More About Criss-Cross. One benefit of the criss-cross design is that it promotes cleavage by bringing the breasts closer together, and if you gain or lose weight you can change the position of the straps to adapt. It will also make it easier for you to resell the bra in the future to someone else who may be a slightly different size than you. The bra shown in the photo above was custom-made for me in Egypt before I managed a 50-pound weight loss. By moving the position of the straps and adding some padding in front, I altered it enough to continue wearing it.
  • Expose Your Best and Hide the Rest! Remember that bare flesh calls attention to itself. So choose costume designs that reveal your best features and cover the ones you want to de-emphasize.

PHOTO CREDIT: Photo of Shira by John Rickman Photography, San Jose, California.

Shira

By Melissa Amira

Melissa Amira is based in Austin, Texas.

  • Lighting. Always check out your costume under different lighting. Fabric that may appear totally safe and opaque under home lighting may become completely transparent under stage lighting.
  • Get A Second Opinion. Have a trusted friend who will give you an honest opinion watch you spin or turn in your costume to catch any problem areas that you may miss by looking at yourself in a mirror. Your friend can see you from all angles. You, alone, can not.

By Helen M

Helen M is based in Cleveland, Ohio.

  • Choosing a Design. Don't imitate - Create! Let yourself be inspired by beautiful costumes of all sorts (not just belly dancing), then create your own vision. Look for inspiration everywhere - a bouquet of flowers, the summer sky, a photograph or painting.
  • Safety Issues. Keep safety in mind for costumes used for fire dancing, even if the "fire" is just candles. Stick to natural fabrics, avoiding synthetics that can melt to the skin leaving nasty burns. Actually, this rule applies to any specialized kind of prop or dancing. For example, costumes for dancing with snakes should not have anything sharp that could injure the animal.
  • Jewelry. Bracelets, gauntlets and hand decorations help the eye follow hand and arm work. A pretty necklace and hair piece draw attention to the dancer's face.

PHOTO CREDIT: Photo of Shira by Carl Sermon of Reel Sound & Light Photography, Los Gatos, California.

Shira

By Lisa

Lisa majored in costume design for her undergraduate work in college.

  • Suiting Your Personality. When costuming for a play the costume needs to help both the message of the play/scene as well as the development of the character. The same should be true of bellydance.
  • Principles of Design. The principles and elements of design that taught in art classes that are used for painting, sculpture, and other visual arts also apply both to dance and costuming. These include Balance, Rhythm, Proportion, Dominance, and Unity, and should consider line, shape, direction, size, texture, color, and value.
  • Fabric Choices. Consider the fabrics that you are using together. I have seen costumes where the skirt and the fringe stick to each other and became more and more sloppy looking as the dance went on.

PHOTO CREDIT: Photo of Shira by Pixie Vision Productions, Glendale, California.

Shira

By Tanya

Tanya is based in New Jersey.

  • Fit. Look for a costume that fits (or will fit after altering). That means no gapping, sagging, squeezing, or slipping. Also no pins showing when performing.
  • Body Type. A costume that flatters your body type. I know that lycra is the costume du jour, but some people just can't wear lycra without looking funny. Find a look that works with your body and go with it. Things to consider are your body proportions (top heavy, bottom heavy, middle heavy, tiny all over) skin color amd hair color.
  • Dance Style. Research the costuming worn by the style you intend on performing. Yes, 25 yard skirts are super cool, but if you're not a tribal dancer they may not be practical. Look around at dancers who perform similar styles and see what they are wearing. Costuming can be expensive and buying items you won't use is silly.
  • Versatility. Bra and belt sets are way way more versatile then the bra and skirt sets. You can change your skirt (style, color, etc) and have a completely different looking costume.
  • Versatility. If you can only buy one costume buy something simple that can be embellished or worn in multiple ways. A simple gold bedlah (bra/belt set) will get you far.
  • For Rounded Rears. If you have curvy buttocks look for cupped-butt belts. The cupped shape eliminates the gapping problem.
  • Completing the Look. Costuming should extend past the torso. Decorate your neck, your hair, and don't forget your arms.

PHOTO CREDIT: Photo by Michael Baxter, Santa Clara, California.

Shira

 

By Faedra

Faedra is based in Raleigh, North Carolina.

  • For Renaissance Faires. Cotton cotton and more cotton! That's my favorite for making basic things like skirts and harem pants! It may not be as pretty or flashy as some of the silky printed fabrics but its so breathable that its worth it! I also like that it gives me a sort of tribal or folksy flair without going all the way.

By Zia Bat Ali

  • Dancing with Fire. Always wear natural fibers if you will be dancing with or around fire because they leave no residue after they burn. Synthetic fibers are made with petroleum products, and if they catch on fire they will melt and cling to your skin, rapidly giving you serious burns. In contrast, silk and cotton burn cleanly into ashes that won't harm you.

 

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Breaking In a New Costume

By Shira

  • Practice! When you get a new costume, practice in it at home before you ever wear it on stage the first time. Do the same sort of dance when you practice that you plan to do when you're performing. In other words, if you'll be doing veil work on stage, include that in your practice. Find out how your costume pieces move, whether anything catches on them, whether you'll trip on the length of the skirt, whether the zippers stay up, whether the costume constricts your movements in any way before you're on stage in front of your audience!
  • Preserving Bra & Belt. Before wearing your bra and belt, line them with either felt, cotton terry cloth, or cotton velveteen. This should be the final step, after the costume is otherwise complete. Baste it into place with loose, easy-to-remove stitches. The lining will absorb your perspiration as you dance. Over time, as the lining becomes soiled, you can remove it and replace it with fresh fabric. This minimizes how often you'll need to launder your delicate costume pieces.
Shira

 

By Zafira

Zafira is based in Virginia.

  • Securing Hooks. Bra/belt hooks aren't always sewn on securely when new costumes arrive. Go over them with embroidery thread to make them hold better.

 

By Faedra

Faedra is based in Raleigh, North Carolina.

  • Closures. Always make sure that your closures (snaps, buttons, ties) are securely fastened to the garment, a lot of costumes give way at these points because of the stress put on them.

 

By Lisa

Lisa majored in costume design for her undergraduate work in college.

  • Keep Belts From Slipping. Put lingerie tape (not double stick body tape, but the stuff they put on the inside of thigh-highs) on the inside of belts to stop them from slipping down, up, or around. Kitchen shelf liner also works, but it wears out sooner.

 

 

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Making & Modifying Costumes

By Shira

  • Making Belts. When making a belt, don't sew it together on either side — instead, put closures on both sides. If you later gain or lose weight, you can then adjust the size evenly on both sides. Even if you're not prone to weight changes, do this anyway — it will make it easier to sell your belt someday because the prospective buyer will find it easier to adjust the belt to a size that fits her.
  • Safeguard Your Valuables. Are your valuables in a safe place while you dance? Here's one way to make sure: At the time you make a new skirt, veil, or pantaloons, use a scrap of the leftover fabric to make a small drawstring pouch. When dancing, you can wear this pouch at your hip, and tuck valuables such as credit cards, cash, watch, and keys inside. Secure it to either the inside or the outside of your costume using either safety pins, the ties, or a pair of large snaps. As long as the contents aren't too bulky, you can probably hide most of it under your belt so it won't flop around while you dance.
  • Buying Costumes. If you purchase a costume directly from the person who made it, try to also purchase a bit of extra matching fabric, trim, beads, and paillettes. That way, you'll have the supplies needed in the future to do repairs, make matching accessories, or adjust the size of the costume if needed.
  • Bra Straps. When making a dance bra, modify the straps — if you have the standard bra style of one strap over each shoulder, you'll risk having the straps fall down while you're dancing — especially if you're doing shoulder rolls or snake arms.
  • Velcro. Avoid velcro — there's too much risk of another costume item made of soft fabric (such as your veil) catching on the velcro while you dance and possibly tearing. (This is Shira's opinion, but Sulisha expresses a different point of view below.)
  • Avoid Wandering Pads. All too many dancers have been humiliated by their bra pads slipping into view or falling out. To avoid this blooper, use double-sided toupée tape to anchor them into position. This works on both fabric padding and the gel-filled silicon inserts.
  • Don't Forget This Accessory! Whenever you buy new skirt or pants, at that time also acquire appropriate underwear to go with it. Even if you have plenty of underwear like the type you would wear under the new item, acquire a new pair for the costume anyway. Store it on the same hanger as the pants/skirt you plan to wear it with, or embed it into the folds if you're storing the garment in a drawer. Every time you grab your costume to pack your gig bag, the appropriate undergarment will be right there and included in your packing. After wearing, launder promptly and return to the hanger or drawer. Storing the underwear with the costume it matches will ensure that you'll always have it when you need it.

 

By Sulisha Kanouni

Sulisha lives in Salt Lake City, Utah and has been dancing 34 years, 25 of those years in Middle East dancing. In these years she has performed throughout the United States and Canada, mainly in the Middle East or Greek nightclubs dancing with live bands.

  • Velcro. Velcro can be a good closure for belts. There has to be at least 1 piece along the top and one piece along the bottom edges of the belt, about 3"-4" long. Add an additional piece in the middle if your belt is heavy (this applies to beaded costumes only). The advantage is that you can put the belt on quickly, no hunting for hooks and trying to "hit" the clasp exactly to fasten the belt. Hook & clasps are sometimes difficult to find in all the shiney beadwork. Also, if you gain or lose a little weight, the velcro can adjust for that. 
  • Positioning Velcro. When sewing on the velcro, make sure the bottom velcro pieces align as closely as possible on the ends with the top velcro pieces. This prevents the top part, or overlapping part of the costume from "flapping in the breeze" so to speak, and catching on something. 
  • Preventing Velcro Snags. To prevent snags, sew the fuzzy part of the velcro on the bottom or underlying side of the belt, and the plastic hooking part on the side that overlaps. Silk fabrics are friendly with velcro, as are chiffons. Lurex materials (looser woven with metallic threads running through them are the culprits.

 

By Kahina El Nar

Kahine El Nar is from Sacramento, California.

  • Belts And Pins. Hand-sew strong bias tape across the inside back of the belt to use when pinning skirts and pantaloons to your belt. This will help you avoid making pin holes in the belts, and it's easier to put pins through than the full thickness of the belt. Stitch the bias tape down along the bottom edge, leaving the top edge open. This way you can reach inside your costume in the back with the diaper pin, and secure everything nicely.

 

By Paola

Paola is an Italian dancer in the Netherlands.

  • Elegant Gloves. Net gloves in the same color as your costume add an elegant finishing touch, as modeled by Paola here in this photograph. They can be purchased in Cairo. But the problem arises when you want those gloves in a particular colour, such as a special shade of green. Just buy white gloves — they are made out of cotton, so they are very easy to dye in the colour you prefer. Add the dye powder little by little in warm water, and try the colouring first on a white cotton cloth, to check if that is the right shade of colour you wish. When it is the color you want, you can dip quickly your net gloves into the water. The pearls on them will not be damaged or coloured, so gold stays gold, silver stays silver. Rinse the gloves in cold water, and the trick is done.
Paola Wearing Net Gloves

 

By Helen M

Helen M is based in Cleveland, Ohio.

  • Repurposing. Think outside the box. Elastic hair scrunchies can stretch enough to be anklets. Upholstery tassels can become headpiece or belt decorations. A necklace can become the beaded trim on a top.
  • Disassemble! Look beyond an element to the components. Garments can be taken apart, the fabric and trims reused on other items. Belts can be taken apart and converted into necklaces, bracelets or earrings. Jewelry can be disassembled, beads can be recycled into unique, exciting beaded designs.
  • Test Ideas. Test radical ideas on rags, scraps or cheap ugly fabric, one that's the same weave (stretch or non) and about the same weight as the final fabric. Practice in the test garment and the final garment before performing. I once thought it would be clever to attach lightweight plastic "jewels" to a sleeve drape. I ended up smacking myself in the face with those silly "jewels" over and over and over again!
  • Cutting Bead Work and Delicate Fabrics. Fabric glue and Fray Check are my friends. To cut bead work or delicate fabric without raveling, make a thin bead of glue, flatten it with a fingertip or popsicle stick, let it dry and cut right down the center of the fabric.

 

By Klaire

Klaire is based in Sioux City, Iowa.

  • Beading. Get a bead spinner for making costumes and jewelry! I made a bedlah by hand before I even knew they existed (including the fringe), and I will never do that again! A bead spinner saves so much time, and they're not very expensive.

 

By Dina Lydia

  • It's A Snap! Sew big snaps on the center front, back and sides of your pants or skirt, and the corresponding halves on the inside of your belt. Snap up when you get dressed, and you'll have no more frantic safety-pinning backstage at the last minute! (For more costume advice from Dina, see her column elsewhere on this web site, Ask The Costume Goddess.)

 

By "Glitrgerl"

  • A Little Extra. Need padding in your bra? Try the gel-filled pads that look, feel, and move like real flesh. They're pricey, but when you put them in your bra they give you instant bust enlargement, and they look like the real thing. They're sold in upscale lingerie catalogs, the lingerie sections of some department stores, and through ads in the backs of women's magazines.

 

By Lisa

Lisa majored in costume design for her undergraduate work in college.

  • Avoiding Muffin-Top. Many dancers wear belt-less skirts that make unattractive muffin tops due to the tight elastic on the top edge. Obviously, you don't want the skirt to be so loose it falls off, but it's best to look for a way to keep it up that won't cause muffin-top. One potential solution is to wear the skirt over a belt form, giving the structure of a belt with the look of a tight skirt. This can be seen on the video By Dancers for Dancers Volume 2, being worn by Zari.
  • Interchangeable Accents. I'm planning to make a bra-skirt combination to make a detachable waistband, as well as a chiffon gore in the slit that will snap on and off. (The arm bands, can also be changed.) This way i'll be able to add in other colors to the skirt set for a different look and have it still be part of the cohesive design.

 

By Faedra

Faedra is based in Raleigh, North Carolina.

  • Well Fitting Bras. Whether you make it or buy it, it is absolutely essential that your bra fit well and give you adequate coverage. I can't count how many times I've seen dancers who had bras that were too small and caused them to spill out of the cups and it always seems to make the costume look ill-fitting no matter how pretty it is!
  • Belt Shape. Contoured belts always look better than perfectly flat or rectangle belts because they trace the lines of the hips better and give a much smoother look.

 

By Kisaya Rayne

Kisaya Rayne is based in Austin, Texas.

  • Securing Clasps. Use upholstery thread to attach hook & eye sets to costumes. I have yet to have a problem with the thread breaking. I've used this for everything from Renaissance Faire costumes to stage shows, and just about everything I've done. I still check it occasionally, but it held up even on a costume my daughter wore almost daily for a year.
  • Beading. When doing my own beading, I secure each section by its own thread, and double it up if I can. That way if one little beaded piece comes off, the rest of it won't be slowly unraveling. For a costume with very little beading, or that you're beading yourself, double stitching it or running a second thread through the drapes can help if one thread fails. I also always check my beading between performances. If one of the threads breaks, I always run a second one through it.
  • Examining the Costume for Needed Repairs. By checking over each piece when I take it off, and again when I'm preparing the costume to use again, I can find any little flaws or damage that may result from either use or storage. (Though I've never had a problem with damage in storage unless someone else has been digging through my costumes.) Checking twice (once after use and once before the next use) I've just doubled my chances of catching something wrong with the costume that I might have missed the first time.
  • Items That Tie or Lace Up. If the ties tend to come undone easily, always have a back-up. I have a belt that likes to come untied when I'm dancing. For a while I used to pin it shut and just use the ties for decoration, but I'm planning to add hook and eyes to the back to hold it shut. For costumes belts that don't meet evenly enough to add hook closures, the next best option is to replace the ties or add a secondary tie that's more secure and use the original more for decoration.

 

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Costume Care

For many ideas on how to keep costumes odor-free, see Costume Care: Keep It Smelling Fresh! elsewhere on this web site.

 

By Shira

  • Wash Separately. If you wash a new garment (such as a gallabiya or cover-up) purchased from Egypt, India, or other such country, wash it separately the first few times to avoid discoloring other garments if the dye bleeds.
  • Laundering Garments Made Overseas. Use cold water to launder and air-dry rather than putting in the dryer. Some garment makers don't pre-shrink their fabrics, and if you machine-dry the items the trims may shrink a different amount from the fabric, causing puckering.
  • Beware of Hangers! Beware of storing skirts or dresses on hangers. Some fabrics can stretch out of shape while hanging. Hemlines can end up crooked. It is safer to store such garments folded.
  • Avoid Snags. If the costume contains embellishments such as rhinestones that can snag, fold or roll it up with a piece of simple cotton fabric to protect the costume fabric.
  • Removing Smells. Make a mixture that is half vodka and half water. Place it in a spray bottle. Spray onto the inner side of the garment. For a light odor, a light misting may suffice. For a stronger, more intense odor, it may be necessary to saturate the fabric. Let dry. Repeat if necessary. For particularly stubborn odors, it may be helpful to use pure vodka instead of mixing it with water.

 

By Helen M

Helen M is based in Cleveland, Ohio.

  • Fit and Condition. Make sure your costume fits well and everything is securely fastened. If you haven't worn the costume before or recently, test it out ahead of time, give yourself enough time to make repairs or alterations as necessary.
  • Caution with Pins. Safety pins can damage fragile fabrics, like chiffon lurex, if they're under too much pressure. Blunt decorative pins can also damage fabric.

 

By Zafira

Zafira is based in Virginia.

  • Airing Out. Air out your costumes before storing, I typically lay mine out on a wooden laundry rack for 3-5 days before putting away.
  • Storage. I store my beaded bedlah (bra/belt sets) in pillow cases in a wooden dresser with little bags of desiccant (the stuff that absorbs moisture).

 

By Klaire

Klaire is based in Sioux City, Iowa.

  • Outdoor Wear. Never wear a skirt trimmed with sequins outside – it will pick up dead grass and leaves and it will be very difficult to clean.
  • Sequins on Shoes. If you have sequins on shoes, make sure they’re not bent. If they are bent or coming loose, they will snag harem pants.
  • Belly Drape. Don’t wear belly drape made out of metal chain if you are allergic to metal even if it is only for a short while. Not only will it get itchy, but it will turn your stomach green!

 

Shara

Known as "S" on tribe.net, Shara has been dancing since 1983, professionally since 1988. She has been teaching since 1990. She is based in Kansas.

  • Before Putting Away. Inspect, clean, repair, and air out your costume after each performance. That means going over every little piece. Keeping it maintained each time keeps you from having a very large job right before you need that particular costume in your next performance!

 

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Makeup Tips

 

By Amber Taylor

Amber Taylor is based in southern California.

  • Using Glitter. Apply body glitter to cheeks, shoulders and tummy, or on your upper body, face, and shoulders to draw attention away from problem areas.
  • Brilliant Eyes. Apply blush to the whole eyelid before applying eyeshadow. This aids in bringing out the shape of your eye and makes the colors used appear more brilliant.

 

By Shira

  • Keep It Fresh. At least once a year, go to a professional makeup artist to have your makeup done. Look for new ideas you can bring into doing your own stage makeup in the future.
  • Makeup Bag. Dedicate a special bag to your dance makeup. Stock it with all the cosmetic items you are likely to need when you do a performance: eye shadow, eyeliner, eyebrow pencil, lipstick, foundation, blush, and anything else. If some of these are items you use on a normal daily basis, then purchase duplicates of them to keep in your makeup bag. Keep it permanently packed with these supplies. Then, when the time comes to do a performance, you can just grab the makeup bag and go, confident that you won't forget anything.
  • For Eye Pencils. Keep a sharpener for eye pencils in your makeup bag. Pencils can dull or break at the most inconvenient time possible!
  • Applicators. Keep spare applicators in your makeup bag for eye shadow and liner.
  • Update Contents. After each performance, before putting the makeup bag away, review the contents to see if any items need replacing. if so, take care of it immediately so your kit will be ready to next time you need it.
  • For Makeup Removal. Purchase wipes/towelettes for makeup removal, and keep some in your dance kit at all times. Liquid makeup removers can leak in your bag and stain your costume or destroy your eye shadows, while wipes won't have that problem.
  • For Makeup Removal. If you travel frequently by air in the U.S., carry makeup removal wipes instead of liquid removers. Wipes don't need to be included in the small liquids bag of your carry-on luggage.
  • For Makeup Removal. Consider buying a Norwex micro-fiber makeup removal cloth to keep in your dance bag. It removes makeup using just water, and dries quickly. You'll never again have to worry about remembering to restock your supply of makeup removal wipes or liquid. Click here to visit Norwex's web site, learn more about the product and (if you like) order a set of three.

PHOTO CREDIT: Photo by Kaylyn Hoskins, Solon, Iowa.

Makeup

 

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Other Ideas

By Shira

  • Dancing Outdoors. When dancing outdoors, it's a good idea to wear pantaloons under your skirts. The slightest wind will catch on your skirts and expose whatever is underneath.
  • Pins. You'll probably need to use pins to hold your belt, skirt top, and pantaloons together to keep the pieces from slipping around. Diaper pins work very well for this.
  • Avoid Distractions. Make sure the cleavage exposed by your costume isn't too revealing. Make sure your skirt isn't too long and your shoelaces (if you're wearing shoes) are securely tied. In other words, eye your costume critically before you wear it in public to make sure there's nothing about it that will draw audience attention away from your beautiful dancing. If they're busy wondering whether you will trip and fall, or whether you'll pop unexpectedly out of your bra, then instead of admiring your artistic dance they'll be focusing with fascinated horror on the thing they expect to go wrong. I had one friend tell me she remembered a double veil performance I did in a Christmas show while wearing a Santa Claus hat — she was so obsessed with wondering whether the hat would come loose and fly away while I was spinning that she never really saw the dance I was doing. She meant it as a compliment — that she was impressed that I did a difficult dance while wearing a Santa hat, but in retrospect I think wearing the hat was a bad costume decision because it drew the focus completely away from my dance and turned it into a novelty act!
  • Beware of Fabric Conflicts! Never try to use a silk veil with a crushed velvet costume. The silk clings to the velvet. Fabric anti-static spray doesn't help.

 

By Lisa

Lisa majored in costume design for her undergraduate work in college.

  • For Plastic Straps. Plastic straps are very shiny under stage lights. To make them more invisible, use the same powder that you set your foundation with on top of them to reduce the shine.

 

By David Steele

David A. Steele is from Denver, Colorado. He is known as Robert of the Mountains in the SCA.

  • When Dancing With Fire. If you are dancing near a campfire, or using a candle or other open flame as a prop, do not wear loose-fitting clothing. You wouldn't want to risk having your beautiful costume catch on fire, and be ruined, would you? And you certainly wouldn't want to risk injuring yourself! Avoid draping yourself with veils and scarves. If you wear sleeves, choose ones that fit tightly below the elbow — either use long cuffs, or make the sleeves tight-fitting all the way. Narrowly-cut skirts or straight skirts are safer than full circle skirts. But if you feel a circle skirt is the most appropriate costume for your overall show, then before you dance near the open flame tuck it like this: reach down with your left hand, and pick up the end of the skirt on your left side. Cross it across your front, and tuck the end in at your right hip. Repeat on the other side.

 

By Amy Walker

Amy Walker is from the southern U.S.

  • Transporting It All. Carry outfits on a hanger and put shoes, accessories, etc. in a plastic bag that hangs around the hook of the hanger — sometimes an easier option than carrying clothes on a hanger plus a bag.

 

By "Nifty Stitches"

"Nifty Stitches" is based in Australia.

  • Puffy Sleeves. I am not a sewing kind of person, but I did manage to make a pair of chiffon harem pants one day. I never wore them after that, until winter came and my arms were cold. (I tried to make sleeves, but somehow it didn't look the way it was meant to look.) So, I put my arms in the "sleeves" of my harem pants, and the elastic of the waist up to my shoulders and behind my back. It looked great, nice big sleeves, good fit, 'no worries'. I can now tuck my veil in without wondering when it will fall out while dancing, and untuck it when it is time to, because of the elastic band.

 

By Zafirah

Zafirah is based in Virginia.

  • Pinning. I use a diaper pin on the inside of the costume, only through the lining, from one side of the belt to the other side. It is just insurance and it's not going through decorated fabric.

 

By Klaire

Klaire is based in Sioux City, Iowa.

  • Safety Pins. Keep a few safety pins pinned to the inside of a costume piece, like a belt of a jacket. Someone will always need one right before you need to be on stage, and the stash is your purse will be too far away to grab.

 

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Related Articles

 

 

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